20131023-044715.jpgApalachee Indian tribe lost its language, heritage through verbal passing from elders to newer generations, arts, crafts, tool making for survival farming, burial ceremonies , tribal lands and tens of thousands of lives. #Tallahassee #Florida and State of Florida are complicate in #genocide against the people of the Apalachee Indian Nation.
The current government of Florida and Tallahassee need to correct this and contact #POTUS for immediate Federal Reconization of the remaining Apalachee Indians still alive. There current location is know publicly. With all the rights and privileges that have been withheld all of these years. Also set aside and give back land in the Tallahassee area that has natural resources, running streams, woods, flat fertile high ground for farming. I will continue to fight for the rights and lives that were taken.

General Assembly resolution 96 (I), adopted on 11 December 1946, affirmed “that genocide is a crime under international law which the civilized world condemns”.
The crime of genocide is defined in article II, the provision that sits at the heart of the Convention. Genocide is a crime of intentional destruction of a national, ethnic, racial and religious group, in whole or in part.

In the years after the United States’ Louisiana Purchase, the Apalachees in Louisiana faced encroachment by settlers, and discrimination as a non-white minority, particularly severe after the end of the American Civil War. Under the state’s binary racial segregation laws passed at the end of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, they were classified as “colored” or “black”.
The tribe’s descendants in Louisiana, known as the “Talimali Band of Apalachee”, still live in Rapides Parish under the guidance of Chief Gilmer Bennett. In 1997 they started the process of seeking federal recognition. Since they have become more public, they have been invited to consult with Florida on the reconstruction at Mission San Luis, invited to pow-wows, and invited to recount Apalachee history at special events.

Prior US Army 71-74  Marine 80-83

Jean Andre Vallery   Comments are welcome!

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